Pet Hazards for the Easter Holiday

Just before your Easter dinner, Fido swallows half of that chocolate Easter bunny that was lying on the table. Suddenly, your holiday celebrations have turned into a nightmare! Avoid these common Easter pet hazards by following these tips from your Oakville veterinarian.

Easter Lilies

Did you know that the lily flower is toxic to cats? Almost all species of the lily can cause vomiting, diarrhea, central nervous system depression, and worse. If you’ve received Easter lilies in a bouquet, remove them and dispose of them where your cat can’t reach. It’s best to keep them away from dogs, too, as lilies may be toxic for them as well.

Chocolate

Of course, all chocolate is a big no-no for pets. The offending agents in chocolate are theobromine and caffeine. All varieties, including milk, semi-sweet, baker’s, white, and dark, can cause serious health problems to pets. Don’t leave chocolates lying around where pets can swipe them.

Candy, Gum, Baked Goods

Many candies, gum, and certain baked goods are sweetened with an artificial sugar substitute known as xylitol. Xylitol is fine for humans, but it can cause serious poisoning in cats and dogs. Even a few pieces of candy or sticks of gum can induce vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, and more. Always have your Oakville vet’s number on hand to call immediately should your pet accidentally swallow candy, gum, chocolate, or anything else hazardous to their health.

Easter Baskets

Not only do Easter baskets contain deadly chocolates and candy, the plastic grass they’re usually lined with can be very dangerous. Pets might see these shiny little strings as fun play objects, but they can all too easily get wrapped around a pet’s intestines if swallowed, potentially requiring surgery. Keep your pet away from all Easter baskets to be safe.

Easter Eggs

Fake plastic Easter eggs may contain hazardous chocolate and candy, and could break into pieces that could be choked on. The shells of real eggs could break off and cut a pet’s paws and mouth if they try to eat one. It’s best to keep your pet indoors while embarking on your Easter egg hunt, or keep them tethered where they can’t get into anything hazardous.